In the Minarovich Gallery
 

Carnival Commanders

by The Aluminum Quilting Society
(Roan Bateman, Sarah Copoc, Daniel Hill, Dave Hind, Gord Pullar, and many more...)


July 12 - September 9, 2012

Opening Reception: Thursday, July 12, 2012 at 7:30pm


WATCH: Dave Hind of the Aluminum Quiliting Society speaking at the Opening Reception


Curated by Phil Irish

The Aluminum Quilting Society, a collective of artists initiated by Dave Hind, not only beguiles us with artworks bursting with imagination, but challenges us to think about our shared lives in new ways. The very process of creating these works –  crammed with story, humour, and whimsy – embodies an alternative to our society’s individualism and ecological consumption. Assembling playful images of Canadiana, innocent children, and military or governmental might, theirs is a lighthearted revolution.

The works are not painted but constructed from scavenged materials such as industrially coated aluminum.  Areas of shimmering raw metal and bold industrial colours form graphic compositions, laced with intricately scratched and gouged drawings. A visit to the dump is a regular practice, as the Society gathers choice refuse for their craftsmanship. Recently, Dave Hind discovered the remains of a midway ride adorned with military aircraft, paratroopers, and aircraft carriers. Seeing the military industrial complex rendered in the style of childhood amusement was irresistible: the weighty aluminum was carted back to Hind’s barn and studio on the outskirts of Brantford.

Peace Officer is an enormous work that recasts the “equestrian monument,” a traditional icon of ruling power. A police officer sitting astride a colossal horse is joined by a motley assemblage of common folk. The power is not solitary and dominating, but is owned and perhaps co-opted by the anarchic revelry of children and wild creatures. Collage-like, these inserted figures are made by an array of contributors from the general public and school children, as well as the core members of the Society. Riding behind the officer is an adolescent girl – Dave Hind’s daughter. When someone contributed a gas mask that fit perfectly, he followed the path of creative improvisation and riveted the mask over her face. She is now both banner-bearing freedom fighter and an activist that recalls the events of the G20 protests. The children present a forceful case for a diverse and free future.

At the heart of these works is the collaborative process of their making. The process of “quilting aluminum” was developed by Dave Hind, yet he is relinquishing the model of artist and assistant. Drawing many voices into the creative process is yielding surprising and liberating results, a true expression of the values Hind espouses. Not only creative with materials and imagery, they are now becoming creative with money, resources, time, and intellectual property. This is a carnival you won’t want to miss.

 

 

The Minarovich Gallery is open Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm
Saturday and Sunday, 12noon - 4pm.

Located at the Elora Centre for the Arts
75 Melville Street
Elora, ON N0B 1S0
519-846-9698